Tadoussak | To the whales in the fog

About a month ago, our photographer went to Tadoussac to watch whales at the end of summer. Despite the thick fog, he met people very happy to have the experience and took some impressive photos.

Posted at 11:30 am

Edouard Plant-Freshette

Edouard Plant-Freshette
Press


PHOTO BY EDOUARD PLANT-FRESCHETT, THE PRESS

Whether a whale watching cruise is the pretext or the main reason for visiting Tadoussac, travelers are generally very pleased with what can be found on land or at sea. Drive to the bay docks.


PHOTO BY EDOUARD PLANT-FRESCHETT, THE PRESS

At the Marine Mammal Interpretive Center, we learned that Piper was the first right whale to be tracked by a satellite transmitter. Her iconic story, released by the Group for Research and Education of Marine Mammals (GREMM), highlights all the dangers that await these giants of the sea. In-depth research revealed that she survived a collision with a boat and dragged a cage with a crab and her rope for two years. Despite this, Piper had two little ones during her life. The exact cause of his death remains a mystery.


PHOTO BY EDOUARD PLANT-FRESCHETT, THE PRESS

For those who prefer peace and quiet, the morning cruise seems less crowded than the early afternoon, and therefore offers more space between the different vantage points. Fog, on the other hand, usually dissipates during the day.


PHOTO BY EDOUARD PLANT-FRESCHETT, THE PRESS

This small whale approached only a few tens of meters from the boat. He was close enough to get a good picture and reveal a significant scar on one of his sides. Guides aboard the boat attributed the injury to fishing gear and its rope.


PHOTO BY EDOUARD PLANT-FRESCHETT, THE PRESS

As the boat approached, a magnificent flock of cormorants disappeared on the seashore in the thick fog.


PHOTO BY EDOUARD PLANT-FRESCHETT, THE PRESS

A more adventurous gray seal popped up only a few meters from the boat before diving back to feed.


PHOTO BY EDOUARD PLANT-FRESCHETT, THE PRESS

The radar screen is a good way to get a little familiarity with the space that is available Big river. In addition to the weather, it helps to better understand the topography of the seabed and to try to predict where there may be aggregations of marine mammals based on reports from other boats in the area.


PHOTO BY EDOUARD PLANT-FRESCHETT, THE PRESS

Margot Bedel has been living in Quebec for two months. She took advantage of the weekend to travel from Levis and offer her two children this wonderful experience on the St. Lawrence.


PHOTO BY EDOUARD PLANT-FRESCHETT, THE PRESS

In this dense fog, the Haute-Fon-Prince lighthouse was undoubtedly at the height of its beauty. Built in 1964 on one of the most dangerous shoals of the St. Lawrence, the “tupi” is located about 7 km from Tadoussac.


PHOTO BY EDOUARD PLANT-FRESCHETT, THE PRESS

After several hours on the seashore in the fog, the sun finally warmed the cruise passengers who were looking for a spectacular picture for the finale selfie. Mola Delvey from the Paris region will leave pleasant memories of the holiday.


PHOTO BY EDOUARD PLANT-FRESCHETT, THE PRESS

Two seals and a minke whale swam side by side at the end of the day’s cruise.

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